Category Archives: Strength & Conditioning

Capitalize on Coaching Opportunities

Interactions with athletes are littered with opportunities to have a positive impact on their lives. It requires being present to their needs, what they’re asking, and what they’re open to at the present moment. Your athlete might be preparing to start an event requiring a little bit of last minute technique and mental preparation coaching. Or on the flip side of the event an athlete that just DNF’ed (Did Not Finish) might require some immediate empathizing and encouragement to allow the distress of the event to wear off before exploring what caused the DNF.  These are prime opportunities to have a lasting impact on the athlete’s future performance, whether it’s the event they’re about to start or the event after the DNF’ed event.

Last minute preparation is a very individualized process, however sometimes there are certain obstacles that can potentially derail our routine. When this happens I encourage athletes to have the courage to bring their concerns to the coach to work through whatever is going on. What a coach does with this opportunity is crucial to the athlete’s performance. The coach must acknowledge the athlete’s awareness of their own process, be very attentive to the athlete’s specific needs, and ensure that the athlete’s needs are met by the conversation. In this scenario the coach must take a holistic approach to ensure that the athlete is mentally and physically prepared for the upcoming event.

DNF’s can occur for a variety of reasons depending on the sport. The cause that is being addressed here is physical and mental preparation. This is a vulnerable time for an athlete because this is what they have prepared for. This situation calls for a much different response than the previous, but both require complete and total presence to the athlete. It’s the coach’s responsibility to figure out what happened, and wait for the opportunity to educate the athlete on what and why it happened. Then the coach must work with the athlete to implement a plan to ensure the same mistake doesn’t reoccur.

Allow this post to be an invitation to be present to each and everyone of your athletes. They’re individuals with different needs. It is your responsibility to meet those needs. I believe in your coaching ability. The question is do you?

Power Skating & Off Ice Conditioning Clinic

Power Skating – Our approach to power skating is technique based. Our teaching method is a tradition passed down from over 50’s years of figure skating and hockey history. We teach from the understanding that skating is an art.

  • Edges are our tools for connecting us to the game
  • Stroking is how we use our edges to paint the ice swiftly and smoothly
  • Turning is using our edges to stroke with the intention of changing direction
  • Starting is our first step towards getting where we need to be
  • Transitioning enables us to face the game without coming to a stop

Off Ice Conditioning – Our approach to off ice conditioning is based on the Long Term Athletic Development (LTAD) model. Educating young athletes on the importance of strength & conditioning is key to developing a life long commitment to being physically active. A secondary benefit from this educational process is improving athletic performance.

  • Warm-up & Pre-hab have many physiological benefits that improve performance and decrease the risk of sustaining a sport induced injury.
  • Power is a key component to our maneuverability in ice hockey. Learning how to become more powerful requires technique work, and understanding how we generate power physiologically & biomechanically.
  • Strength is our ability to stand our ground in times of being challenged for position. We’ll explore ways of improving our strength for all aspects of ice hockey and general conditioning.
  • Hockey Specific Training is about isolating the little nuances of the movement patters that are special to ice hockey, for example our bodies are broken into three sections in order to maintain a heads up style of play (head, torso, lower body). Understanding sport specific training opens up the possibility of knowing how to train specifically for other sports as well, feeding perfectly into the LTAD model.
  • Cool down & Stretching teaches our bodies to go from a high stress state down to a relaxation recovery state. This important step will enable us to perform optimally next time we are required to do so, with  reducing the risk of sport and potential overuse injuries.

Nutrition 101 – Nutrition is a corner stone to a healthy lifestyle. These sessions will be targeted towards the whole family.

  • Macronutrients – carbohydrates, proteins, and fats
  • Micronutrients – vitamins and minerals
  • Hydration
  • Sport Foods